F110-GE-100  
Initial Operational Capability (IOC): 1986
Total Production: 2,500
Also Known As: F110-GE-100B
Origin: United States of America
Corporations: General Electric
Parent System: F110
Initial Operational Capability (IOC): 1986
Total Production: 5,859
Family Members: F110-GE-129, F110-GE-132 and F110-GE-400
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Description: The F110 was developed utilizing the same core design of the F101 engine. This engine has different fan and afterburner packages to tailor engine performance compared with the F101 engine.

The F110 was introduced as an alternative to the Pratt & Whitney F-100 engine to power the F-16 aircraft. Since 1986, it has been the engine-of-choice for all F-16s customers. F110s have better performance, reliability and low operation and support costs over F100s. All over the world F-16C/D Block 30/40 are powered by F110 -GE-100 engines.

The US Air Force plans to upgrade roughly 800 F110 engines powering the F-16 aircraft under the Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) program. The upgraded engines will represent savings of more than $1 billion. The F110 SLEP test program is scheduled for completion in February 2005. GE estimates that SLEP program implementation will last at least six years.

As of November 2004, the program complete more than 1,148 hours of running time simulating 1,333 sorties, 4,639 total accumulated cycles and 8,253 afterburner light-offs. The program is preparing to initiate flight testing with F110-GE-100B SLEP engine and F110-GE-129 SLEP engine this month.

On 23 May 2005, General Electric was awarded a $57 million contract by the US Air Force (USAF) to upgrade an initial 95 F110 fighter engines to the Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) configuration in support of the F-16C/D aircraft. The SLEP program is expected to conclude in 2012 with approximately 800 F110 engines upgraded and delivered to the USAF at a $280 million estimated cost. SLEP is aimed at reducing maintenance costs by $1 billion.

The SLEP program includes technology upgrades to the combustor, high pressure turbine, compressor and augmentor to reduce unscheduled removals by 50% and reduce the cost-per-flight-hour by 25%. Much of this hot-section hardware is derived from the highly-successful CFM56-7 engine, which powers the Boeing 737 jetliner. SLEP programs are also being developed for both the F101 and F118 engines for the B-1, B-2 and U-2 aircraft.

F110-GE-100 Applications


Combat Aircraft F-16C Block 40 F-16C Fighting Falcon F-16D Block 40 F-16D Fighting Falcon Propulsion Systems F110-GE-129

F110-GE-100 Specifications

Dimensions
Fan Diameter: 1,170 millimeter (46 inch)
Length: 4.60 meter (181 inch)
Weight
Dry Weight: 1,778 kilogram (3,920 pound)
Thrust: 28,000 pound (12.7 ton)
CEP: Circular Error Probable
Meters (m)   Kilometers (km)   Nautic Miles (nm)   Inch (in)   Yard (yd)   Foot (ft)   Millimeter (mm)
Pound (lb)   Kilogram (kg)   kN (KiloNewton)   Ton (t)
Meters per Second (mps)   Kilometers per Hour (kph)   Knot (kt)   Miles per Hour (mph)
Liter (l)   Galon (gl)
Year (yr)   Minutes (min)   Second (sec)
Shaft-Horse-Power (shp)

F110-GE-100 News

There are 2 news between
4 Jun 2007 and 18 Dec 2009
Friday, December 18, 2009FMS: Egypt Requests Service Life Extension Program for F110-GE-100 Engines
Monday, June 4, 2007Air Force Secretary Signs Memorandum to Improve F100, F110 Turbine Engines

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