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LEAP-1B  
Initial Operational Capability (IOC): 16 May 2017
Maiden Flight: 29 October 2015
Total Production: 6,398
Unitary Cost: USD$13 million
Origin: France and United States of America
Corporations: CFM International*, General Electric Aviation and Snecma   (*) lead contractor
Parent System: LEAP-X
Initial Operational Capability (IOC): 21 July 2016
Maiden Flight: 9 October 2014
Total Production: 10,653
Family Members: LEAP-1A and LEAP-1C
Reviews
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Description: The CFM International LEAP-X is an entirely new baseline turbofan engine intended to power future replacements for current narrow-body aircraft such as Boeing 737s and Airbus A320s. The new engine leverages the technologies developed under CFM-funded LEAP56 technology acquisition program which started in 2005. CFM International plans to get the first engine demonstrator running by 2012 and achieve engine certification by 2016. The LEAP-X will reduce fuel burn by up to 16 percent compared to current CFM56 Tech Insertion engines.

The new engine's core will feature eight-stage compressor and single-stage turbine. LEAP-X will incorporate three-dimensional, woven resin transfer molding (3-DW RTM) technology that dramatically reduces engine weight while providing a more durable blade as well as Titanium-Aluminide (Ti-Aluminide) lightweight alloy. The 3-DW RTM technology is expected to reduce the engine weight by 400 pounds and the composite fan blade count by 25 percent.

On August 30, 2011, Boeing and CFM International agreed on the LEAP-1B turbofan engine as the exclusive powerplant for its new generation of the single-aisle 737 airliner. The launch versions powered by the LEAP-1B engine and slated to entry into service by 2017 are the Boeing 737 MAX 7, 737 MAX 8, 737 MAX 9 and 737 MAX 200.

LEAP-1B Applications


Airliners Boeing 737 MAX 200 Boeing 737 MAX 7 Boeing 737 MAX 8 Boeing 737 MAX 9

LEAP-1B News

There are 136 news between
30 Aug 2011 and 11 May 2017
1  2  3  4  5  | 14
Thursday, May 11, 2017Primera Air Places Order for up to 12 Boeing 737 MAX 9 Jetliners
Friday, April 14, 2017Silk Way Places Order for 10 Boeing 737 MAX 8 Airplanes
Thursday, April 13, 2017Boeing 737 MAX 9 Successfully Completes First Flight
Tuesday, April 4, 2017Iran Aseman Airlines Signs Agreement for 30 Boeing 737 MAX Jetliners
Monday, March 13, 2017CDB Aviation Lease Finance Places Order for 30 Boeing 737 MAX 8 Airplanes
Thursday, March 9, 2017Boeing 737 MAX 8 Jetliner Awarded FAA Certification
Friday, January 13, 2017SpiceJet Announces Deal for up to 205 Boeing 737 MAX 8 Airplanes
Thursday, January 5, 2017Travel Service Places Order for Five Additional Boeing 737 MAX 8 Jetliners
Wednesday, January 4, 2017GECAS Places Order for 75 Boeing 737 MAX 8s
Sunday, December 11, 2016Iran Air Signs Agreement for 50 Boeing MAX 8, 15 777-300ER and 15 777-9 Airplanes

Operators & Related Equipment


OperatorsItems
Australia46
Engines powering Virgin Australia fleet of 23 737 MAX 8 jetliners (46 engines)
Azerbaijan20
Engines powering Silk Way fleet of 10 737 MAX 9s (20 engines)
Brazil120
Engines powering GOL Linhas Aereas fleet of 60 737 MAX 8 jetliners (120)
Canada262
Engines powering WestJet fleet of 65 737 MAX jets (130 engines); Air Canada 61 737 MAX 8/9 (122 engines); Jetlines 5 737 MAX 7 (10 engines)
China816
Aircraft ordered by Shandong Airlines 34 737 MAX 8 (68 engines); China Eastern Airlines 40 737 MAX 8s (80 engines); Okay Airways 14 737 MAX 8s, 3 737 MAX 9s (34 engines); Hainan Airlines 50 737 MAX 8s (100 engines); 9 Air 30 737 MAX (60 engines); Kunming Airlines fleet of 16 737 MAXs (32 engines); Ruili Airlines fleet of 36 737 MAXs (72 engines); Air China fleet of 30 737-8s (60 engines); Minsheng Financial Leasing fleet of 20 737 MAX 8 (40 engines); China Southern Airlines fleet of 50 737 MAXs (100 engines); Xiamen Airlines fleet of 30 737 MAX 200 (60 engines); Donghai Airlines fleet of 25 737 MAX 8 (50 engines); CDB Leasing fleet of 30 MAX 8s (60 engines)
Czech Republic16
Engines powering Travel Service fleet of 8 737 MAX 8s (16 engines)
Denmark16
Engines powering Primera Air fleet of 8 Boeing 737 MAX 9 (16 engines)
Ethiopia40
Engines powering Ethiopian Airlines fleet of 20 737 MAX 8s (40 engines)
Fiji10
Engines powering Fiji Airways fleet of 5 737 MAX 8 (10 engines)
Germany20
Engines powering TUI Group fleet of 10 737 MAX 8s (20 engines)
Iceland32
Engines powering Icelandair fleet of 16 Boeing 737 MAX jets (32 engines)
India460
Engines powering SpiceJet fleet of 155 737 MAX 8s (310 engines); Jet Airwats fleet of 75 737 MAX 8s (150 engines)
Indonesia562
Engines powering Lion Air's fleet of 201 Boeing 737 MAX (402 engines); Garuda Indonesia fleet of 80 737 MAX 8 (160 engines)
Iran160
Engines powering Iran Air fleet of 50 737 MAX 8s (100 engines); Iran Aseman Airlines fleet of 30 737 MAX (60 engines)
Ireland240
Engines powering Avolon fleet of 10 737-8 and 10 737-9 (40 engines); Ryanair fleet of 100 737 MAX 200s (200 engines)
Japan180
Engines powering SMBC Aviation Capital fleet of 90 737 MAX 8s (180 engines)
Kuwait40
Engines powering ALAFCO fleet of 20 Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets (40 engines)
Malaysia50
Engines powering Malaysia Airlines fleet of 25 737 MAX 8s (50 engines)
Mexico180
Engines powering Aeromexico's fleet of 90 737 MAXs (180 engines)
Netherlands200
Engines powering AerCap fleet of 100 737 MAX 8s (200 engines)
Norway200
Engines powering Norwegian fleet of 100 Boeing 737 MAX jetliners (200 engines)
Panama122
Engines powering Copa Airlines fleet of 61 737 MAX 8 and 9s (122 engines)
Papua New Guinea8
Engines powering Air Niugini fleet of four Boeing 737 MAX 8 (8 engines)
Poland4
Engines powering Enter Air fleet of two 737 MAX 8s (4 engines)
Qatar120
Engines powering Qatar Airways fleet of 60 737 MAX 8s (120 engines)
Russia70
Engines powering Aviation Capital Services fleet of 35 737 MAX airliners (70 engines)
Singapore184
Engines powering SilkAir fleet of 31 737 MAX 8 jets (62 engines); BOC Aviation fleet of 61 737 MAX 8s (122 engines)
South Africa16
Engines powering Comair Limited fleet of 8 737 MAX 8s (16 engines)
South Korea60
Engines powering Korean Air fleet of 30 737 MAXs (60 engines)
Spain40
Engines powering Air Europa fleet of 20 737 MAX 8s (40 engines)
Switzerland4
Engines powering Comlux fleet of two BBJ MAX 8s (4 engines)
Thailand14
Engines powering NOK Air fleet of 7 737 MAX 8s (14 engines)
Turkey160
Engines powering Turkish Airlines fleet of 65 737 MAX jets (130 engines); SunExpress 15 737 MAX 8s (30 engines)
United Arab Emirates150
Engines powering Flydubai fleet of 75 737-8 MAX (150 engines)
United Kingdom180
Engines ordered to power TUI Travel Group fleet of 60 Boeng 737 MAX 8/9 (120 engines); Monarch Airlines fleet of 30 737 MAX 8s (60 engines)
United States of America1,426
Engines powering ACG's fleet of 35 Boeing 737 MAX (70 engines); Southwest Airlines fleet of 180 737 MAXs (360 engines); ALC fleet of 101 737 MAXs (202 engines); GECAS fleet of 170 737 MAX ( (340 engines); United Airlines fleet of 100 MAX 9s (200 engines); Alaska Airlines fleet 20 737 MAX 8 and 17 727 MAX 9 (74 engines); Aviation Capital Group fleet of 50 737 MAX 8s and 10 737 MAX 9s (120 engines); CIT Group 30 737 MAX 8s (60 engines)
Vietnam200
Engines powering VietJet Aviation fleet of 100 737 MAX 200 (200 engines)

Grand Total 6,42837
 
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