FMS: Pakistan New F-16C/D Block 50/52 Aircraft


Released on Wednesday, June 28, 2006
Pakistan
United States of America
AIM-120C AMRAAM
AIM-9M Sidewinder
AIM-9M-9 Sidewinder
AN/ALQ-131
AN/ALQ-178
AN/ALQ-184
AN/ALQ-187
BLU-109
F-16C Block 50
F-16C Block 52
F-16D Block 50
F-16D Block 52
F100-PW-229
F110-GE-129
GBU-24 Paveway III
GBU-31 JDAM
GBU-38 JDAM
GBU-49 Paveway II
JHMCS
AMRAAM - Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile
DRFM - Digital Radio Frequency Memory
DSCA - Defense Security Cooperation Agency
GBU - Guided Bomb Unit
GPS - Global Positioning System
GWOT - Global War on Terrorism
IPE - Increased Performance Engine
JDAM - Joint Direct Attack Munition
MDE - Major Defense Equipment
SINCGARS - SINgle Channel Ground and Air Radio System
The Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) notified Congress of a possible Foreign Military Sale to Pakistan of 36 F-16C/D Block 50/52 Aircraft as well as associated equipment and services. The total value, if all options are exercised, could be as high as $3 billion.

The Government of Pakistan has requested a possible sale of

Major Defense Equipment (MDE): 36 F-16C/D Block 50/52 aircraft with either the F100-PW-229 or F110-GE-129 Increased Performance Engines (IPEs) and APG-68(V)9 radars; 7 spare F100-PW-229 IPE or F110-GE-129 IPE engines; 7 spare APG-68(V)9 radar sets; 36 Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing Systems; 36 AN/ARC-238 SINCGARS radios with HAVE QUICK I/II; 36 Conformal Fuel Tanks (pairs); 36 Link-16 Multifunctional Information Distribution System-Low Volume Terminals; 36 Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Embedded GPS/Inertial Navigation Systems; 36 APX-113 Advanced Identification Friend or Foe Systems; 36 Advanced Integrated Defensive Electronic Warfare Suites without Digital Radio Frequency Memory (DRFM) or AN/ALQ-184 Electronic Counter Measures pod without DRFM or AN/ALQ-131 Electronic Counter Measures pod without DRFM or AN/ALQ-187 Advanced Self-Protection Integrated Suites without DRFM; or AN/ALQ-178 Self-Protection Electronic Warfare Suites without DRFM and 1 Unit Level Trainer.

Associated support equipment, software development/integration, modification kits, capability to employ a wide variety of munitions, spares and repair parts, flight test instrumentation, publications and technical documentation, CONUS-personnel training and training equipment, U.S. Government and contractor technical and logistics personnel services, and other related requirements to ensure full program supportability will also be provided. The estimated cost is $3 billion.

Given its geo-strategic location and partnership in the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT), Pakistan is a vital ally of the United States, as reflected in the June 2004 designation of Pakistan as a Major Non-North Atlantic Treaty Organization Ally. This proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping an ally meet its legitimate defense requirements. The aircraft also will be used for close air support in ongoing operations contributing to the GWOT.

Consistent with U.S. conventional arms transfer policy and arms control initiatives, this potential sale will allow the Pakistani Air Force to modernize its aging fighter inventory, thereby enabling Pakistan to support both its own air defense needs and coalition operations.

Release of this system would not significantly reduce India's quantitative or qualitative military advantage. Release of the F-16C/D Block 50/52 aircraft to Pakistan will neither affect the regional balance of power nor introduce a new technology as this level of capability or higher already exists in other countries in the region.

The principal contractors will be: BAE Advanced Systems Greenlawn, New York; Boeing Corporation Seattle, Washington; Boeing Integrated Defense Systems St Louis, Missouri (three locations) Long Beach, California San Diego, California; Raytheon Company Lexington, Massachusetts (two locations) Goleta, California; Raytheon Missile Systems Tucson, Arizona; Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Fort Worth, Texas; Lockheed Martin Missile and Fire Control Dallas, Texas; Northrop-Grumman Electro-Optical Systems Garland, Texas; Northrop-Grumman Electronic Systems Baltimore, Maryland; Pratt & Whitney United Technology Company East Hartford, Connecticut; General Electric Aircraft Engines Cincinnati, Ohio.

The Defense Security Cooperation Agency notified Congress of a possible Foreign Military Sale to Pakistan of Weapons for the F-16C/D Block 50/52 Aircraft as well as associated equipment and services. The total value, if all options are exercised, could be as high as $650 million.

The Government of Pakistan has requested a possible sale of

Major Defense Equipment (MDE): 500 AIM-120C5 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missiles (AMRAAM); 12 AMRAAM training missiles; 240 LAU-129/A Launchers; 200 AIM-9M-8/9 SIDEWINDER missiles; 500 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) Guidance Kits: GBU-31/38 Guided Bomb Unit (GBU) kits; 1,600 Enhanced-GBU-12/24 GBUs; 800 MK-82 500 pound General Purpose (GP) and MK-84 2,000 pound GP bombs; and 700 BLU-109 2,000 pound with FMU-143 Fuze.

Associated support equipment, software development/integration, modification kits, capability to employ a wide variety of munitions, spares and repair parts, flight test instrumentation, publications and technical documentation, CONUS-personnel training and training equipment, U.S. Government and contractor technical and logistics personnel services, and other related requirements to ensure full program supportability will also be provided. The estimated cost is $650 million.

Given its geo-strategic location and partnership in the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT), Pakistan is a vital ally of the United States, as reflected in the June 2004 designation of Pakistan as a Major Non-North Atlantic Treaty Organization Ally. This proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping an ally meet its legitimate defense requirements. These weapon systems will be used for close air support in ongoing operations contributing to the GWOT.

Consistent with U.S. conventional arms transfer policy and arms control initiatives, this potential sale will allow the Pakistani Air Force to modernize its aging fighter and weapons inventory, thereby enabling Pakistan to support both its own air defense needs and coalition operations.

Purchase of these weapons systems would not significant

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